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In the final episode of Long Lost, host Jack El-Hai takes stock of where things stand with the case of the missing Klein brothers, what can be done and what we owe the boys’ family members, who are still searching for answers.


A picture of the 4 brothers (from left to right) Kenny, Danny, Gordon and David taken in 1950, the year before the disappearance.


Host Jack El-Hai and Sheriff’s Deputy Jessica Miller look at photos from the Klein case file.


Here, Jessica points out Kenny who, in her words, is the one with the “smiley eyes.”

Our team will be back with any updates as the case continues to unfold. If you have any information about the disappearance of Kenneth Jr., David and Danny Klein, you can reach us at [email protected] or call us at 651-229-1524.

One of the oldest active missing persons cases in the state of Minnesota, the Klein brothers’ story resurfaces in Long Lost: An Investigative History Series, weaving together the details of that day they went missing in 1951, right up until the present moment. You can listen to the final episode of the podcast at the top of this article.

You can also start at the very beginning in the first episode of this true-crime podcast, Long Lost Episode 1: Look Everywhere. Then head directly into Long Lost Episode 2: Searching EndlesslyLong Lost Episode 3: The SuspectsLong Lost Episode 4: What’s Hidden, and Long Lost Episode 5: Patty Wetterling.

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This story is made possible by the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund and the Friends of Minnesota Experience.

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Get a brief overview of where the Long Lost podcast series is headed in this preview.

Discover more web series from TPToriginals.org, including Relish, which revolves around the intersection of food and culture, and Minnesota Niche, which captures the stories behind unique social groups. 

Minnesota is no stranger to notoriety when it comes to crime and criminals. In June 1977, the wealthy heiress Elizabeth Congdon and her nurse were murdered inside Glensheen Mansion on the North Shore. Congdon’s adopted daughter, Marjorie, and Marjorie’s then-husband were accused of the crime. But the fallout from the trial and subsequent suspicions for other crimes is the stuff of legend. Read all about it in Glensheen’s Gilded and Grisly Past.