Minnesota U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar had the honor of being the first person to introduce the 46th President of the United States, Joseph Biden. The former presidential candidate and current member of the Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies played a prominent role in the swearing in of the new president in Washington, D.C.

“Democracy has prevailed,” Biden proclaimed, following the moment he took his oath of office in the same spot where violent insurrections stormed the Capitol two weeks prior.

Klobuchar noted the many firsts on this day, particularly the appointment of the first Black and South Asian Vice President, Kamala Harris, who was her colleague in the U.S. Senate. The Minnesota Senator also used her trademark sense of humor acting as emcee, “This is the first inaugural where JLo was the warmup act for Chief Justice Roberts.”

A recent scene from the Minnesota State Capitol.

Back in Minnesota, the Capitol grounds were quiet two weeks after violent rhetoric filled the mall here, though weapons charges reveal that an Owatonna man wanted to kill police and politicians at a pro-Trump rally at the Minnesota State Capitol.

Elected officials in the state continue to take a stand, some with divisive language. DFL Party Chair Ken Martin said in a press conference, “Either you’re on the side of Nazis and white supremacy, or on the side of democracy, liberty, freedom, the constitution.”

In response, GOP Rep. Steve Drazkowski responded, “It’s shameful Chair Martin invokes the term Nazis in an insensitive way.”

Stay tuned to Almanac, which airs on TPT2 on Fridays at 7 am and Sundays at 9:30 am, for ongoing coverage of the new Biden-Harris administration and its impact on Minnesota.

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With the state’s budget forecast improved by billions of dollars, the Minnesota Department of Management and Budget is now predicting a surplus as concerns of a major shortfall fade. Almanac Political Reporter Mary Lahammer asked lawmakers to weigh in on the state budget surplus during an especially uncertain year.

With a lot of shuffling among political positions in the wake of the November election, Minnesota remains the only state in the nation with a divided House and Senate. Almanac Political Reporter Mary Lahammer offers this look at what that means for the political road ahead.